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SUTUREGARD® MEDICAL INC. Blog

 
We have previously discussed skin grafts and flaps (link to those posts). The major distinction in a skin flap and skin graft is blood supply. Skin flaps have a connected blood supply. Skin grafts do not have connected blood supply. Recall that the lack of a connected blood supply limits the potential thickness of a skin graft. If the graft is too thick, the blood supply from the wound base may be inadequate and result in partial or total loss of the graft.
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You may recall that a skin graft involves taking a piece of skin from one area of the body and using that skin to cover the original wound (link to blog post Oct 4). The graft relies on the blood supply of the wound bed to get nutrition. During the first few days after the grafted skin is placed, the graft will “drink” from the wound bed, hence the term imbibition. By day 3 to 5, the graft has usually created adhesions to the wound bed.
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First, let’s back up. Tissue is sent for pathology to answer one of two questions: “what is it?” or “did I get it all?” The question of “what is it?” is answered with the initial sampling, or biopsy. A piece of skin (or other tissue) is removed from a patient, preserved (or “fixed”) in formalin, sliced into thin pieces, stained so that cellular detail can be seen and then examined under the microscope. In dermatology, biopsies are performed to diagnose rashes as well as to evaluate for ...
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Usually, excisional wounds are created with an ellipse: where the length of the wound is about 2-4 times longer than the width. This allows the wound to be closed without “bunching” of the ends. When closing these elliptical wounds, the initial suture is usually placed in the middle, widest and most difficult portion of the wound to close. This is known as the rule of halves:
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Newly published research in the Journal of Clinical Biomechanics supports using novel devices, such as the SUTUREGARD® ISR Retention Suture Device and the HEMIGARD™ Adhesive Retention Suture Device, to initiate approximation of high-tension surgical wounds. Learn more about Suturegard devices!
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SUTUREGARD® Medical will be presenting at the American Society for Mohs Surgery (ASMS) Closure Course in Phoenix, AZ the weekend of January 25th-26th, 2020.
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SUTUREGARD® Medical, Inc is excited to announce that CEO Dan Ladizinsky, MD, will be presenting SUTUREGARD® Medical at Arab Health. Arab Health, which runs January 27 to 30 in Dubai, brings in over 4,250 companies to showcase all the latest innovations in healthcare.
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Retention sutures are heavy gauge percutaneous sutures, used in high tension wound closures to support primary wound closure. Typically, the term “retention suture” has been used in the general surgical literature to discuss closure of open, complex laparotomy wounds. Learn more about our bridges!
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Thin fragile skin can occur with age, severe sun damage or chronic steroid use. Often, they are on blood thinners, and the accompanying skin hematomas can rapidly cause skin necrosis. Those injured are high-risk patients, and hospitalization or outpatient care for these injuries can be prolonged.
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The official collaboration between Operation Smile & SUTUREGARD® Medical Inc. Operation Smile is the most prestigious and charitable global plastic surgery organization worldwide, dedicated to improving surgical care of underprivileged peoples, with an emphasis on cleft lip and palate repair.
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