Skin Flap Alternatives

SUTUREGARD® Medical, Inc. Blog

 

We have previously discussed skin grafts and flaps (link to those posts). The major distinction in a skin flap and skin graft is blood supply. Skin flaps have a connected blood supply. Skin grafts do not have connected blood supply.

Recall that the lack of a connected blood supply limits the potential thickness of a skin graft. If the graft is too thick, the blood supply from the wound base may be inadequate and result in partial or total loss of the graft.


A wound bed can supply nourishment to only a limited thickness of skin graft. Beyond that, there is risk of failure.

The robust blood supply of a flap allows for a much thicker piece of skin to be placed over the wound

Placing this piece of skin with a connected blood supply (flap) over the wound can take one of two major forms:


Outline of steps for a staged flap

The pedicle of the flap carries the blood supply to the tip. The tip of the pedicle is moved over the wound and sewn in place. The area where that flap was taken is closed. The surgery is left to heal for several weeks. In those weeks, the “tip” skin develops its own blood supply. After this period, the pedicle is severed, resulting in a healthy and thicker piece of skin than a graft.

Wound area

  • Nasal tip
  • Helical rim of ear
  • Finger tip
  • Side (ala) of nose

Donor

  • Forehead
  • Skin of upper neck
  • Palm (thenar) skin
  • Cheek
Table of some common staged flaps

Related

Press Release - SUTUREGARD® Medical and Federated Healthcare Supply Sign Non-Exclusive Distribution Deal

SUTUREGARD® Medical has formed a non-exclusive distribution partnership with Federated Healthcare Su...

Read More >

Press Release - Patient Self-Removal of HEMIGARD During COVID Now Published

JAAD Case Reports recently published, “Use of a novel adhesive suture retention wound closure devic...

Read More >

Reducing the Impact of Pretibial Lacerations

Thin fragile skin can occur with age, severe sun damage or chronic steroid use. Often, they are on b...

Read More >

Do "Deep" Sutures Help My Skin Wound Closures?

This is a frequent question that is posed to me by my Mohs fellows. First off, by "deep sutures...

Read More >

What is Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)?

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer. While basal cell carcinoma (BCC...

Read More >

The Next Step In Incision Management: Reducing Surgical Wound Dehiscence

Surgical wound dehiscence is one of the most dreaded & costly of surgical complications. It is distu...

Read More >

Relax & Close, More Wounds, More Simply.

Making wound closure easier for surgeons and better for patients.

Order Now